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Baseball Boys

Baseball Boys

Boys and baseball...forever the two are enshrined in bronze in this delightful three-piece bronze featuring a catcher, hitter and pitcher at QuikTrip Park, home of the Grand Prairie AirHogs minor league baseball team.

Belt Line Mural

Belt Line Mural

The eye catching mural at the intersection of Interstate 30 and Belt Line Road spans 617 feet of concrete, depicting prairie scenes and wetlands from the frontier days. Tommy Weddle of Dallas started painting the mural in spring 2003 and, as intended, completed the project in time for the Breeders’ Cup. [READ MORE]

Betty Warmack Library Sculptures

Betty Warmack Library

Sculpted by Colorado artist Gary Alsum, the “Picture Books” bronze sculpture at the Betty Warmack Branch Library celebrates the wonder of reading. The award-winning artist explains that “Children are my favorite subjects because they approach life with wonder and delight.” He tries to rekindle that youthful enthusiasm through his sculptures. [READ MORE]

Charles V. England Public Safety Training Complex statues

Charles V. England Public Safety Training Complex

Dedicated to the public safety personnel who protect the citizens and businesses of Grand Prairie, the sculpture features a life-size police officer and firefighter, as well as two small children playing with a fire truck and police car. The sculpture alludes to the daily heroism of Grand Prairie police officers and firefighters, who are the protectors of our future and suggests professional admiration and inspiration. [READ MORE]

Convergent

Convergent

Convergent, by Damian Priour, was installed in 2010 at the Athletic Entrance to The Summit, 2975 Esplanade. The glass and limestone commissioned artwork reflects the relationship between water and dirt, sky and earth as the element soar and converge in a celebration of ecology, sustenance and nature.

Dominoes

Dominoes at The Summit

Copper dominoes stand on end building upon each other as they reach skyward at the entrance to The Summit Active Adult Center, 2975 Esplanade. Artist Rebecca Low designed the abstract larger-than-life rectangles in 2009. The copper’s rich patinas and golden hues light up the entrance for members and visitors.

Freedom Rising Freedom Rising
Gardens at the Ruthe Jackson Center

Gardens at the Ruthe Jackson Center

The Gardens at the Ruthe Jackson Center offer a lushly landscaped outdoor event venue perfect for weddings, receptions, parties and special occasions.
Featured amenities at the Gardens include an elevated pavilion, lawn, pond, creek with waterfall, trees, sidewalks, beautiful landscaping, space for seating and art sculptures. [READ MORE]

Glass Art

Glass Art

Glass is the finest piece of art that you can add to your home or office. Each piece in the arrangement in the city’s Human Resources Annex, 318 W. Main St., was uniquely hand blown to create an array of color and motion. These bowls were formed by a group of artisans from the northwest United States heavily influenced by the glass of Murano, Italy. [READ MORE]

Gold Star Banner

Gold Star Banner

Gold Star Banner tells the story of the creation of the Blue Star Banner program in World War I, reflecting the commitment and sacrifice of families of the men and women who died while in service to their country. The idea evolved from the Gold Star Mother’s Room located in the old Veterans Memorial Center. This piece was produced by Matt Glenn  of Big Statues, Provo, Utah.

Hangar Talk

Hangar Talk

At the city’s QuikTrip Ballpark, 1600 Lone Star Parkway, “Hangar Talk” features life-size airmen from WWII, Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm and greets guests as they arrive at the entrance to the ballpark. The four-piece bronze sculpture is a commissioned piece by artist Sandra Van Zandt. Hangar Talk commemorates Grand Prairie’s rich aviation history, beginning in 1929 and spanning the decades through today. [READ MORE]

Icarii 

Icarii

The Icarii, also known as the People of the Wing, was created by artist Tim Prentice in 2010. The three-piece commissioned sculpture features hundreds of custom-made aluminum and stainless steel sails working together in a larger sail to move together yet apart creating light play, undulations, and interesting effect. The sculpture takes flight in the lobby of The Summit Active Adult Center, 2975 Esplanade, for its members and guests.

I Love My Country

I Love My Country

This is a Patriotic Sculpture of a Boy and Girl Climbing to the Top of the Mountain. It is located on the south side of the Veterans Event Center. It was purchased by Randolph Rose.

 

Icarii
Journeys of the Mind

Journeys of the Mind

Children exploring the wonders of reading, cast in bronze and set on native Texas limestone greet residents as they arrive at the Grand Prairie Memorial Library, 901 Conover Drive. “Journeys of the Mind” is a three-statue grouping cast in 2009-2010. [READ MORE]

Lone Star Gas Bldg

Lone Star Gas Flame

Atop the former Lone Star Gas building on the corner of Church and NW 2nd streets, now the city's Housing and Neighborhood Services Department, the old Lone Star Gas flame continues to light the night sky in downtown Grand Prairie. The former commercial office building of the Lone Star Gas Company featured the traditional blue flame when it first opened in June of 1962. Architects Smith and Warder of Grand Prairie designed the building’s façade out of brick, granite, aluminum and glass, mounting the historic neon flame on an extended steel column attached to a granite wall. [READ MORE]

Lone Star Park Statue of Alysheba

Lone Star Park Statue - Alysheba

This 1 ¼-scale bronze statue of Alysheba was unveiled at Lone Star Park on Sept. 29, 2004, the year that the Grand Prairie, Texas, racetrack hosted the Breeders’ Cup World Thoroughbred Championships. Since then, the 1000-pound statue, designed by renowned equine artist Lisa Perry, has been a focal point upon entering Lone Star Park’s main East Gate entrance, as it sits atop a landscaped knoll inside the valet parking circle. [READ MORE]

Lone Star Park Statue Commemorating Opening

Lone Star Park Statue - Commemorating Opening Day

A life-size bronze statue depicting the Lone Star Park logo, a horse and rider running on top of a star, adorns the area just inside the East Gate main entrance adjacent to the paddock saddling area at Lone Star Park at Grand Prairie. “Dedicated to the Citizens of Grand Prairie, Texas,” the statue commemorates Opening Day, April 17, 1997, of Lone Star Park’s inaugural season. A plaque on the statue acknowledges both the members of The Grand Prairie Sports Facilities Development Corporation, and the Grand Prairie City Council.

Fairy Tales

Main Library Entrance Sculptures - Fairy Tales

Two life-size bronze sculptures were added to the entrance to the Main Library in 2008. "Fairy Tales," a little girl in a red shirt reading a book, was created by Texas artist Marianne Carolselli, who has been sculpting and painting for more than 30 years. She is one of the most renowned sculptors of young children in the Southwest, and her pieces are in many private and public collections across the country. [READ MORE]

Once Upon a Time

Main Library Entrance Sculptures - "Once Upon a Time"

Two life-size bronze sculptures were added to the entrance to the Main Library in 2008. "Once Upon a Time," a little boy in a brown shirt and blue jeans reading a book, was created by Texas artist Marianne Carolselli, who has been sculpting and painting for more than 30 years. She is one of the most renowned sculptors of young children in the Southwest, and her pieces are in many private and public collections across the country. [READ MORE]

Market Square

Market Square Water Tower

Standing tall at the corner of Main Street and NW 2nd St., a pot-belly water tower reminiscent of such structures from the early 1900s acts as a beacon to draw people to Market Square and Farmers Market in downtown Grand Prairie. The replica harkens back to the glory days of Main Street and forecasts such prosperity in the foreseeable future as downtown is transforming into a busy, event-filled destination.

Police Headquarters

Police Headquarters

At the entrance to the new Public Safety Building, 1525 Arkansas Lane, a large inlaid black granite sculpture honors our fallen police and fire, proclaims the values of the departments and displays the badges of Fire and Police in etched stone. Designed with input from police officers and firefighters, the elegant piece gives off a sense of strength, humility and respect.

Prairie Paws Adoption Center Artwork

Prairie Paws Adoption Center Art

A seven foot by seven foot bas-relief sculpture in brick including color glazing features a prairie scene bordered with individual plants and animals, on display in the lobby of Prairie Paws Adoption Center. Installed in 2003 when Prairie Paws was a new facility, the artwork cost just under $25,000 and was paid for by private donations and a contribution from the Grand Prairie Facilities Sports Corporation, which gave $1.5 million toward the cost of the facility. [READ MORE]

Ruthe Jackson Center Fountain

Ruthe Jackson Center Fountain

A cascading copper bowl water fountain twists over a shallow pond, greeting guests as they enter the city’s Ruthe Jackson Conference Center, 3113 S. Carrier Parkway. Creating the tranquil sound of a babbling brook, the fountain accentuates the “welcome home” feel of the center, while simultaneously creating a “wow” factor for guests.

Tourist Information Center Art

Teri Jackson Tourist Information Center Art

At the Teri Jackson Tourist Information Center, 2170 Belt Line Road, a three-panel steel triptych features Grand Prairie tourist attractions. Steel on the $60,000 sculpture is laser-cut and finished with an acid wash to encourage a rich rust patina. Artist Alice Bateman of Fort Worth designed each panel to make the observer feel like a participant in the action.  [READ MORE]

Uptown Theater Blade

Uptown Theater Blade

A work-of-art in itself, the city’s historic Uptown Theater’s original distinctive pink and green neon marquee was restored in 2007 as the first part of the renovation of the entire theater, which re-opened in 2008 as a theater and arts center. The neon blade again lights up downtown Main Street with its unique automated sequencing of light.

In addition, the original wall tiles were restored and the terrazzo tile entrance was extended on Main Street. The original porcelain enamel under-panels of the awning were restored, and then brightly lit with neon beautifully reflected in a restored mirror wall over the front doors. [READ MORE]

Veterans Memorial

Veterans Memorial

The Veterans Memorial located at 925 Conover Drive, behind the Senior Citizens Center and the Main Library, consists of five granite-clad columns that represent each branch of the U.S. military. The columns are engraved with the names, rank and date of death of the 51 Grand Prairie veterans lost during military service. Construction began in October of 2004 with the final inspection being completed May 6, 2005. [READ MORE]

When Pigs Fly

When Pigs Fly

Flying above the heads of game goers at QuikTrip Park, our sassy flying pigs feature mom, pop and baby fashioned from recycled airplane parts by Utah artist Fred Conlon.

Willow Tree

Willow Tree

Mirrored by the water in which it stands, a Willow Tree rises along the lakeside promenade of Grand Prairie Central Park just outside The Summit, 2975 Esplanade. Arching stainless steel branches hold 80,000 mother-of-pearl leaves that shimmer silvery green, changing with the light, reflecting on the water’s surface to evoke the impressionistic paintings of Claude Monet. [READ MORE]


Baseball Boys 

Boys and baseball...forever the two are enshrined in bronze in this delightful three-piece bronze featuring a catcher, hitter and pitcher at QuikTrip Park, home of the Grand Prairie AirHogs minor league baseball team.

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Belt Line Road Mural 

The eye catching mural at the intersection of Interstate 30 and Belt Line Road spans 617 feet of concrete, depicting prairie scenes and wetlands from the frontier days.

Tommy Weddle of Dallas started painting the mural in spring 2003 and, as intended, completed the project in time for the Breeders’ Cup. The city paid Weddle $35,000 to paint the mural as part of a $650,000 effort to spruce up the area for the Breeders’ Cup hosted at Lone Star Park. Special projects coordinator Tammy Chan helped oversee the mural as part of the city’s Keep Grand Prairie Beautiful program.

Most of the work was done using a 3-inch paintbrush illustrating the diversity of wildlife and habitats native to the area. Wild mustangs, buffalo and grey wolves cover three corners at the intersection of Belt Line Road and I-30. The fourth corner depicts a wetlands dotted with wading birds.

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Betty Warmack Library Sculpture

Sculpted by Colorado artist Gary Alsum, the “Picture Books” bronze sculpture at the Betty Warmack Branch Library celebrates the wonder of reading. The award-winning artist explains that “Children are my favorite subjects because they approach life with wonder and delight.” He tries to rekindle that youthful enthusiasm through his sculptures. Educated at Dordt College in Sioux Center, Iowa and at the University of Northern Colorado, Alsum now lives in Loveland, Colorado with his wife and four children. His inspiration comes from memories of his childhood and from observing his own children and their friends. The “Picture Book” sculpture was done in an edition of 18 which sold out prior to 2003. Our sculpture is one of two artist’s proofs. It has a patina (coloration) the color of French brown with some areas “brushed back” to a more golden color. It was purchased entirely through donations in 2003.

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Charles V. England Public Safety Training Complex

Dedicated to the public safety personnel who protect the citizens and businesses of Grand Prairie 24/7, the public art sculpture features a police officer and firefighter standing watch over two children. The bronze was created by Cindy and Terry Burleson, cast by Schaefer Art Bronze and cost $61,000. The funding was raised in part from the private sector, with a substantial donation having been made by the Grand Prairie Fire Association, who purchased the #1 marquette, and personalized brick sales, spearheaded by Police Chief Glen Hill’s office. This is the first installed piece of the Keep Grand Prairie Beautiful Community Art Program.  In keeping with the city’s new public art policy in which art works will be included with all new facilities, a new lifesize four-figure bronze sculptural tribute to Grand Prairie’s police officers and firefighters was unveiled at the grand opening celebration on Feb. 5, 2003.

Interesting facts about the sculpture include:

First Project: The sculpture is the first major art project of the city’s Keep Grand Prairie Beautiful Community Art Program.

Concept: The concept was developed based on feedback from the Police and Fire Associations.

The Firefighter’s Association voted to name the firefighter “Swadley” in honor of the Swadley family firefighting legacy, which includes the only firefighter to ever die in the line of duty: Kermit C. Swadley.

The Police Association voted to leave the name of the police office blank as a tribute to all police officers: past, present and future.

Two Themes: The sculpture features a life-size police officer and firefighter, as well as two small children playing with a fire truck and police car. The sculpture alludes to the daily heroism of Grand Prairie Police Officers and Firefighters, who are the protectors of our future and suggests professional admiration and inspiration.

Artists: Cindy Burleson and Terry Burleson from Austin

Sculpture: 4 piece life-size bronze

Cost: $61,000, raised from seed money from the City’s Keep Grand Prairie Beautiful Community Art Program, public and private donations, including the funds raised during an auction that included meals prepared by the City Manager, Mayor and police and fire personnel.

Placement: The life-size sculpture is located at the southwest corner of the new Charles V. England Public Safety Training Facility.

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Convergent

Convergent, by Damian Priour, was installed in 2010 at the Athletic Entrance to The Summit, 2975 Esplanade. The glass and limestone commissioned artwork reflects the relationship between water and dirt, sky and earth as the element soar and converge in a celebration of ecology, sustenance and nature.

[BACK TO TOP]


Dominoes at The Summit

Copper dominoes stand on end building upon each other as they reach skyward at the entrance to The Summit Active Adult Center, 2975 Esplanade. Artist Rebecca Low designed the abstract larger-than-life rectangles in 2009. The copper’s rich patinas and golden hues light up the entrance for members and visitors.

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Gardens at the Ruthe Jackson Center

The Gardens at the Ruthe Jackson Center offer a lushly landscaped outdoor event venue perfect for weddings, receptions, parties and special occasions.

Featured amenities at the Gardens include an elevated pavilion, lawn, pond, creek with waterfall, trees, sidewalks, beautiful landscaping, space for seating and art sculptures. The 22,500-square-foot area is encased by a beautiful Austin stone wall, with etched and stained concrete surrounded by gardens, ponds, waterfalls, a walking trail and a carpet of grass. The Gardens can seat 250 in theater-style or up to 175 in rounds of 10. The Gardens opened in 2009. Partially funded by the Grand Prairie Sports Facilities Corporation, the Gardens represent an $800,000 investment in the successful Ruthe Jackson Conference Center.

“The Gardens are a living work of art,” said Parks and Recreation Director Rick Herold. “Our clients, especially brides, were asking for something outside. And, we saw an opportunity to take advantage of the beautiful weather we enjoy here in north Texas so much of the year with an outdoor space at the RJC.”

The Ruthe Jackson Center is located just minutes north of Interstate 20 at 3113 S. Carrier Parkway in Grand Prairie. More information can be found at www.ruthejacksoncenter.com or by calling 972-237-7500.

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Glass Art

Glass is the finest piece of art that you can add to your home or office. Each piece in the arrangement in the city’s Human Resources Annex, 318 W. Main St., was uniquely hand blown to create an array of color and motion. These bowls were formed by a group of artisans from the northwest United States heavily influenced by the glass of Murano, Italy. At 2300 degrees, the molten glass is hand blown using a blow pipe like a paint brush to create each bowl. The colors are created using natural ingredients that swirl, twist and punch the fluted shape. Attached to a horizontal wall, the final product evokes an underwater feel of beauty and peace.

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Hangar Talk

At the city’s QuikTrip Ballpark, 1600 Lone Star Parkway, “Hangar Talk” features life-size airmen from WWII, Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm and greets guests as they arrive at the entrance to the ballpark. The four-piece bronze sculpture is a commissioned piece by artist Sandra Van Zandt. Hangar Talk commemorates Grand Prairie’s rich aviation history, beginning in 1929 and spanning the decades through today, and is personalized with emblems, artifacts and memorabilia of Grand Prairie aviation companies, including North American Aviation, Vought, Lockheed Martin, Bell Helicopter and American Eurocopter. Accompanying the bronze is a black granite monument outlining the city’s aviation history.

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Icarii

The Icarii, also known as the People of the Wing, was created by artist Tim Prentice in 2010. The three-piece commissioned sculpture features hundreds of custom-made aluminum and stainless steel sails working together in a larger sail to move together yet apart creating light play, undulations, and interesting effect. The sculpture takes flight in the lobby of The Summit Active Adult Center, 2975 Esplanade, for its members and guests.

[BACK TO TOP]


Journeys of the Mind

Children exploring the wonders of reading, cast in bronze and set on native Texas limestone greet residents as they arrive at the Grand Prairie Memorial Library, 901 Conover Drive. “Journeys of the Mind” is a three-statue grouping cast in 2009-2010.

Artist Jack Wilson, formerly of Grand Prairie, who is now working in Waxahachie, created the work. Each figure was cast in several pieces at a foundry in Arlington using molds based on the original clay models. Students at Johnson Elementary (where Mrs. Wilson, wife of the artist, taught for more than 20 years) served as the original models for the concept. Paid for in part by the Friends of the Library, the Library Foundation and the Grand Prairie Arts Council.

Jack Wilson grew up in Goodland, Kansas, and came to Grand Prairie in 1970. He received his Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from Fort Hays Kansas State University.

His work can be found in collections and galleries across the United States. Close at hand, his work can be seen at the Fort Worth Police and Firefighters Memorial.

The City of Grand Prairie, the Grand Prairie Memorial Library Foundation, the Friends of the Grand Prairie Library, and the Grand Prairie Arts Council funded “Journeys”.

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Flame Burns Bright in Grand Prairie

Atop the former Lone Star Gas building on the corner of Church and NW 2nd streets, the old Lone Star Gas flame continues to light the night sky in downtown Grand Prairie

The former commercial office building of the Lone Star Gas Company featured the traditional blue flame when it first opened in June of 1962. Architects Smith and Warder of Grand Prairie designed the building’s façade out of brick, granite, aluminum and glass, mounting the historic neon flame on an extended steel column attached to a granite wall. The two-foot-tall blue-tinted flame originally turned on its eight-foot tower.

When the Lone Star Gas Company moved out of the building in 2000, the city renovated the building for the Housing and Neighborhood Services Department and restored the flame, replacing broken neon and adding a new electrical circuit.

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Lone Star Park Statue - Alysheba

This 1 ¼-scale bronze statue of Alysheba was unveiled at Lone Star Park on Sept. 29, 2004, the year that the Grand Prairie, Texas, racetrack hosted the Breeders’ Cup World Thoroughbred Championships. Since then, the 1000-pound statue, designed by renowned equine artist Lisa Perry, has been a focal point upon entering Lone Star Park’s main East Gate entrance, as it sits atop a landscaped knoll inside the valet parking circle. Hall of Fame jockey Chris McCarron, who rode Alysheba in 17 of his 26 career starts, is depicted as the rider in the sculpture. Owned by Dorothy and Pamela Scharbauer, Alysheba won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes in 1987 and finished his career by winning the 1988 Breeders’ Cup Classic. During his career, he won three Eclipse Awards, a 1987 Champion 3-Year-Old Male, Horse of the Year and Champion Older Male in 1988. With more than $6.6 million in career earnings at the time of his retirement, Alysheba was the richest race horse in history.

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Lone Star Park Statue - Commemorating Opening Day

A life-size bronze statue depicting the Lone Star Park logo, a horse and rider running on top of a star, adorns the area just inside the East Gate main entrance adjacent to the paddock saddling area at Lone Star Park at Grand Prairie. “Dedicated to the Citizens of Grand Prairie, Texas,” the statue commemorates Opening Day, April 17, 1997, of Lone Star Park’s inaugural season. A plaque on the statue acknowledges both the members of The Grand Prairie Sports Facilities Development Corporation, and the Grand Prairie City Council.

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Main Library Entrance Sculptures - "Fairy Tales" and "Once Upon a Time"

Two life-size bronze sculptures were added to the entrance to the Main Library in 2008 featuring a little girl and little boy each reading a book. "Once Upon a Time" and "Fairy Tales," both limited edition sculptures, were created by Texas artist Marianne Carolselli, who has been sculpting and painting for more than 30 years. She is one of the most renowned sculptors of young children in the Southwest, and her pieces are in many private and public collections across the country including famous celebrities' such as Burt Reynolds and Wayne Newton. Marianne believes her artwork should be peaceful, loving and relaxing.

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Market Square Water Tower

Standing tall at the corner of Main Street and NW 2nd St., a pot-belly water tower reminiscent of such structures from the early 1900s acts as a beacon to draw people to Market Square and Farmers Market in downtown Grand Prairie. The replica harkens back to the glory days of Main Street and forecasts such prosperity in the foreseeable future as downtown is transforming into a busy, event-filled destination.

[BACK TO TOP]


Police Headquarters

At the entrance to the new Public Safety Building, 1525 Arkansas Lane, a large inlaid black granite sculpture honors our fallen police and fire, proclaims the values of the departments and displays the badges of Fire and Police in etched stone. Designed with input from police officers and firefighters, the elegant piece gives off a sense of strength, humility and respect.

[BACK TO TOP


Prairie Paws Adoption Center Sculpture

A seven foot by seven foot bas-relief sculpture in brick including color glazing features a prairie scene bordered with individual plants and animals, on display in the lobby of Prairie Paws Adoption Center.

Installed in 2003 when Prairie Paws was a new facility, the artwork cost just under $25,000 and was paid for by private donations and a contribution from the Grand Prairie Facilities Sports Corporation, which gave $1.5 million toward the cost of the facility.

Everything represented in the sculpture is native to north Texas. The original list of animals came from Grand Prairie Independent School District fourth graders with further selections from an art committee formed especially for this project.

Although the creative process took several months, the actual carving took Paula Blincoe Collins of Denton, Texas, two months with an additional month for drying and firing the bricks.

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Ruthe Jackson Center Fountain

A cascading copper bowl water fountain twists over a shallow pond, greeting guests as they enter the city’s Ruthe Jackson Conference Center, 3113 S. Carrier Parkway. Creating the tranquil sound of a babbling brook, the fountain accentuates the “welcome home” feel of the center, while simultaneously creating a “wow” factor for guests.

[BACK TO TOP]


Teri Jackson Tourist Information Center Art

At the Teri Jackson Tourist Information Center a three-panel steel triptych features Grand Prairie tourist attractions. Steel on the $60,000 sculpture is laser-cut and finished with an acid wash to encourage a rich rust patina. Artist Alice Bateman of Fort Worth designed each panel to make the observer feel like a participant in the action. The piece was funded through rental fees from the Bank One ATM machine and advertising space leased at the Tourist Information Center.

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Uptown Theater Blade

A work-of-art in itself, the city’s historic Uptown Theater’s original distinctive pink and green neon marquee was restored in 2007 as the first part of the renovation of the entire theater, which re-opened in 2008 as a theater and arts center. The neon blade again lights up downtown Main Street with its unique automated sequencing of light. In addition, the original wall tiles were restored and the terrazzo tile entrance was extended to Main Street. The original porcelain enamel under-panels of the awning were restored, and then brightly lit with neon beautifully reflected in a restored mirror wall over the front doors. The project architect, Killis Almond, a Grand Prairie native now living in San Antonio, is nationally known for his work in theater restoration and renovation. The contractor was Phillips/May Corporation. The Uptown Theater originally opened March 17, 1950.

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Veterans Memorial Art

The Veterans Memorial located at 925 Conover Drive, behind the Senior Citizens Center and the Main Library, consists of five granite-clad columns that represent each branch of the U.S. military. The columns are engraved with the names, rank and date of death of the 51 Grand Prairie veterans lost during military service. Construction began in October of 2004 with the final inspection being completed May 6, 2005.

Designed by city staff and Schrickel, Rollins & Associates, the project was funded by the Grand Prairie Sports Development Corporation, the Grand Prairie Rotary Club, the Grand Prairie Metro Rotary Club, the city and citizens, who also supplied many volunteer hours. 

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When Pigs Fly

Flying above the heads of game goers at QuikTrip Park, our sassy flying pigs feature mom, pop and baby fashioned from recycled airplane parts by Utah artist Fred Conlon.

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Willow Tree

Mirrored by the water in which it stands, a Willow Tree rises along the lakeside promenade of Grand Prairie Central Park just outside The Summit, 2975 Esplanade. Arching stainless steel branches hold 80,000 mother-of-pearl leaves that shimmer silvery green, changing with the light, reflecting on the water’s surface to evoke the impressionistic paintings of Claude Monet.

Viewed from the promenade, this full-size Willow sways gently in the breeze, its handcrafted leaves making gentle sounds, the iridescent surfaces constantly changing with the atmosphere, catching light.

Our ephemeral Willow is a singular centerpiece, which departs from the impersonal machined aesthetic of modern technology, highlighting instead the tradition of arts and crafts: the craftsmanship of welding each twig and branch by hand; applying thousands of custom-cut shell leaves one at a time.

The long-lasting materials render the Willow maintenance-free, only to be enhanced at night by soft illumination to evoke a dreamlike, weightless presence on the lake.

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Last updated: 10/5/2012 1:40:01 PM